Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

The Main Reasons You Are Not Getting A Record Deal

Friday, August 14th, 2009
ShonnyBoy asked:


For mostly stupid reasons, a lot of unsigned artist might feel that getting a record deal with a major or independent label is easy to do, and with a contract success will be guaranteed. And to do this, they feel that all they have to do is send out a few demos and BAM there it is like magic, but thats not the case cause over a million artist send in demos every year and over a million are rejected. So I will give you the major reasons why.

Reason Number 1 - Sending Unsolicited Recordings

Sending Unsolicited Recordings before you send out any demo packages you must always call, email, mail or fax the record label and ask permission to send in your demo package, cause most record companies do not accept demos just sent out of no where, just for the simple fact that you can send them your demo, and then a month later an artist comes out with a song similar to yours, and then you would be able to sue cause you could say that they got the idea from the demo that you send in, so for the record companies protection they keep track of whos demo CDs that they listen to, just to protect them from a lawsuit (note that all unsolicited demos will be returned without being opened) so dont waste your money on mailing the CD.

Reason Number 2 - The packaging

The next reason has to do with demo packaging cause 50% of all the demos sent out to record labels, look cheap with tape all over the envelope, or some messy hand writing with graffiti of their Rap group on the front and back, and the envelope without a return address are some of the main symptoms of poor packaging, but an overall poor quality in the packaging of the demo and the package will not be opened regardless of the music, cause they feel that if the package is of poor quality then the music and the artist are also of that same type of quality.

Reason Number 3 - Your press kit is weak

This one has to do with the contents of the package, as far the press kit it self cause this is what they look at first, before playing your demo. The press kit must include a biography, an 8×10 photo of the artist or group, and a demo cd, the first parts of the press kit are the most crucial to getting your song played, and the first of the two which is the picture and this needs to be of a good quality as far as the look of the picture and the quality of the paper.

(Please do not use a picture printed from your computer, Which may cause automatic rejection)

And the other part is the bio and after glancing at your picture and only if the picture is acceptable they will then begin to look at your bio and this should be a good look into the people behind the music, including where they came from, how they started in music, what they have done, in music and where they plan on going with their music.

(Please do not hand write your bio, For which may cause automatic rejection)

A failure to make a quality press kit will definitely hurt your chances of getting your cd played, and that is only half the battle, so it would be advised that you duplicate a good cd with printed labels.

(Please no handwriting on the cd)

Reason Number 4 - No Contact Information

No Contact Information on any thing. All material sent out must include the same contact information as far as your name, address, email, and phone number on the bottom of your bio, place this information on the bottom of the picture and on the demo CD, plus try to include a business card as well. Basically saying that, if the record labels do not know how to reach you, then they wont reach you. So it would just be a waste to even listen to the CD if they cant call you back.

Reason Number 5 - Your demo is wack

Now that we have gotten the A&Rs attention it now boils down to the demo CD, and first of all if your demo is wack then thats just it you are totally wack dont get mad or complain just accept it and move on to a new career, but if you are not wack and just misunderstood then the next few reasons should help you out of a slump.

Reason Number 6 - Poorly Recorded Material

Number 6 is a reason that sometimes is beyond an artists control, and it has to do with the quality of the recording of the CD, and its due to the fact that the recording industry is like the car industry, where the more you pay for a car then the better the car functions, but all cars not matter how much you pay do the same thing, Drive! And thats the same in music with studios where the expensive ones function better than the garage studios, but they basically do the same job.

So the main ways to record good music no matter where you record, is to first remember sound levels, please do not record your vocals or the beat to loud into your computer and do not burn the CD with the songs very loud, cause it would be better to turn up the volume on a low volume song than it is to turn down a song where the sound is to distorted from being burn on the CD to loud, and another sure fire way get a good sound is to find a good engineer to mix down your music. Plus it is always a plus to consider some digital mastering which would in turn make your CD ready for radio or video play.

Next in this section I want to talk about the format of the songs and how the vocals were recorded. Like 3-4 double and ad-lib tracks covering the main vocals of the song so the listener can barely understand, another bad thing is to have to long of an intro into the song where the beat is just playing or the artist is just talking for more than 8 bars. Then you need to cut that out of all your songs (demo wise) and get straight to the point weather you put a hook first or you start with a verse, do not let the intro go on for more than 4 bars.

Reason Number 7 - Picking the wrong type of songs

Reason number 7 has to do with you picking the Wrong type of songs to put on your demo CD, and the worst type of song off the top is a slow song. Unless you are vocalist and your main focus is to sing slow songs or ballads for the market that your are trying to sell records in, then it is best to be avoided especially if you plan on entering the mainstream market of record sales, cause in this business of music a majority of the time, it is accustomed to record singles for radio play, cause lots of radio play equals a high number of record sales for that album, and if an A&R cannot envision your music on the radio or playing in the club.

They would not be able to see you as an artist that can sell records. Now just try to think about how many slow songs are big on the radio right now. Not to many huh? Another thing to consider when choosing the songs for your demo is to eliminate to explicit lyrics from the music cause it kills all chances of it being played on the radio. I even remember an instance where a certain well know A&R took a demo he received to a club the same night he got it and had the Dj play the song to watch the crowd react to the music, and the response was so good that he signed the artist to a major label deal two days later. So you need to be ready.

Reason Number 8 - To many songs

Now we are at number 8, and it is to have too much material, just remember that a demo CD is not an album, so you do not need to put any skits on your demo or long shot outs to your crew and then do not put To much material on your demo, just because you and your friends think that all the songs are equally good, please dont fool your self, cause when you put to many songs, you start to test the patience of the A&R and it first shows a lack of professionalism and more of a desire to have your music heard than it is a desire to sell records.

Believe me that there is a big difference between the two. So try to understand that record companies are working hard to sell records and they are not here to share the art of music with the world. So just try to limit it to 3 or 4 songs and nothing over 5 minutes long.

Reason Number 9 - Sending The Wrong Music To The Wrong Label

Now we have reason number 9 and this one happens quite a lot and its when an artist sends their demo to any record labels and it has to do with reason number 1 where you need to call the labels and find out if they produce your type of music. Cause wouldnt it be a waste of time for a country singer to send her demo to def jam records. Where there will be a very high chance that she will be rejected due to the fact that this certain record company might not produce or even know how to market and sell that certain type of music. But then again the major labels can handle pretty much anything.

Still it is advised that you do your research by going on the companies websites and check the rosters of artist that have already signed to the labels and see if your style of music fits in or if there is any room for you being a new artist. Where you might see 7 rappers out of 8 artists on a certain label, then that company may not be looking to sign any rappers at the moment until they can release the artist they already have. But then again if you are that good then other artist will not stand in your way, where the label might release your album first. You can never tell.

Reason Number 10 - You are just not what they want

You must remember that this industry is ran by people and not a machine that always makes the right choice, and you can actually have a all the bases covered and came with a damn near perfect demo package and still the A&R wasnt feeling it. Then dont be discouraged cause the person you gave your demo to could have been having problems at home, or about to be fired from that company or thinking about leaving, and they just couldnt hear that good marketable music, or they had already signed enough artist for the year.

And a few major reasons is a lack of development in the image, sound, and star quality of the artist, no experience in live performances or ever selling records as well as a lack of team players like a manager, agent and entertainment lawyer, cause it is always a major plus for a record company to see other professionals believing in your project as much as you do, to where it helps the record company believe in you as much.



How to Attract the Attention of Record Label A&r

Tuesday, August 4th, 2009
Al Fraser asked:


Step 1: Record a collection of tracks. Properly.

Contrary to what some people may think, few people are going to notice your abilities as an artist by listening to a rough demo. Either hire some studio time, enter into an agreement with an up-and-coming producer, or buy some studio gear. Gear is not expensive nowadays, and $800 should get you up and running.

Haven’t got the money? Save up for a while. There are thousands of artists doing the same thing - why not you? An A&R person wants to listen to a polished product. Represent yourself.

Step 2: Get some decent promo photographs made.

Myspace site got a picture of you taken with a web cam? Using your phone to shoot pictures? Not good enough, sorry guys. You’re going to need some great photos of yourself, airbrushed, the works.It’s the first thing an A&R person sees, I’ve found it has a huge bearing on whether your music get listened to or not.

Sounds harsh? I think so too, but that’s the way it is, so make your photos count.You can get great results with a digital camera, and some free photo software. It need not be expensive.

Step 3: Get a proper website.

This is a big one, and possibly one of the most important things you can do. Everyone has a myspace site, but to set yourself out from the crowd, I’ve found a proper website with domain (eg: www.youonline.com) is the way to go.

Web hosting is extremely cheap nowadays, and web development software is free, so there’s no cost barriers to getting this done.Your website must display three things clearly.

1) Your music. Try to have a track start playing when the site is opened.

2) Your photos.

3) Contact information. This is make or break. Make it clear and obvious.

So why the website? Why not stick to myspace? Well, I’ve found that A&R people usually have a million things going on at once. Their offices look like a war zone for the most part. They won’t be searching the web for sites - instead, they may have received a tip-off or recommendation about you.

Your website will be looked at in passing, so you don’t want to cloud the A&R persons attention with a glaring, comment ridden myspace page. Secondly, everyone has a myspace page. My brothers cat has a myspace page..

So set yourself apart from all the other players.But keep the myspace page as well. It’s good for everyone to see you have thousands of friends and fans too..

Step 4: Play out.

Now you’ve got your package together, start playing to audiences. Anywhere you think industry types may be. And it’s not just A&R people you’re after. Promoters, managers…all these people may see you perform. If you’re good, word will get passed around quickly enough, and opportunities will present themselves. Which leads me onto..

Step 5: Attract the attention of a music attorney.

Want to know who are the most under-rated, yet important people in the music industry? The music attorney. These people know everyone…A&R execs, managers, the works. If you manage to meet one (and it’s easier than you think..) doors will open for you, especially if the attorney becomes involved with you on a professional level.

Step 6: Go to industry days and events.

Here’s a story. Whilst I was promoting an artist, there was a music event on in town: A gathering of music equipment manufacturers, open to the general public. In the small print of the flyer, a “demo session” was advertised as part of the music event, giving folks the opportunity to take their demo CD’s along for the critique of music professionals.

So I went to the demo session, armed with a CD thinking they’d be a huge demand for this, and that there was only a small chance my CD would get listened to. I was wrong. There were about 6 people there, including me. So whilst downstairs, in the main hall, thousands of up-and-coming artists were playing with the new toys from instrument companies, I was upstairs with the attention of attorneys, managers and A&R men, all to myself. Can you believe this? It’s true.

The moral of this point? Keep your eyes and ears open for every chance you get.

Conclusion.

Hopefully, this has given you some ideas on how to get the attention of A&R folks. So what happened when the A&R guy from Sony came to my house? Well, he wasn’t impressed when he found out my artist didn’t write her own material..but that’s a tale for another day!



Music Recording Contracts

Monday, August 3rd, 2009
Veronica Lane asked:


For musicians that finally seem to be making their mark in the music world, things can move pretty fast. Amongst all the recognition that is starting to dribble in, along with it comes  a lot of confusion. All of a sudden people are starting to talk about a whole variety of different contracts. One contract they feel makes a bit of sense, because its what they really want, is the music recording contracts. Then on the other hand, especially new musicians are really not to sure what this entails. Asking around the industry, and directing questions to those musicians that have signed these types of contracts, will be very beneficial. You may be very surprised to find out that they are not as lucrative financially as you first thought. In addition they are not all that simple.

 

If a musician believes that they have reached the recording label stage, they would be wise to shop around before signing any music recording contracts. It must also be remembered that a lot of the major recording labels own smaller label companies as well. You may think you are signing on with the larger company, but the contract is actually applicable to one of the smaller subsidiaries. There may be nothing wrong with this at all, as long as you are aware of it, and understand what it all means. You won’t be able to use the, “I didn’t know excuse” after you have signed. Everyone is expected to read any contract they are about to sign

 

Music Recording contract is used when any company is eager to pay the artist to record a album. This contract includes the flexible terms of fee, and, promotional duties. Make sure to get terms that you would like as the artist under publishing sections of an agreement.

 

Music recording contract (normally called record deal) is the legal contract between the record label and the recording artist, where an artist makes the record for label to sell & promote. The artists under contract are generally only permitted to record for that particular label wholly; guest appearances on the other artists’ records may carry the notice “By consideration of”, & that label might receive percentage of sales.

 

Amount of recordings that an artist or band needs to deliver, to record company during one particular period of time you can avoid long contracts, deals etc., unless a record company contracts significantly develop artists career.



How to Attract the Attention of Record Label A&r

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Al Fraser asked:


Step 1: Record a collection of tracks. Properly.

Contrary to what some people may think, few people are going to notice your abilities as an artist by listening to a rough demo. Either hire some studio time, enter into an agreement with an up-and-coming producer, or buy some studio gear. Gear is not expensive nowadays, and $800 should get you up and running.

Haven’t got the money? Save up for a while. There are thousands of artists doing the same thing - why not you? An A&R person wants to listen to a polished product. Represent yourself.

Step 2: Get some decent promo photographs made.

Myspace site got a picture of you taken with a web cam? Using your phone to shoot pictures? Not good enough, sorry guys. You’re going to need some great photos of yourself, airbrushed, the works.It’s the first thing an A&R person sees, I’ve found it has a huge bearing on whether your music get listened to or not.

Sounds harsh? I think so too, but that’s the way it is, so make your photos count.You can get great results with a digital camera, and some free photo software. It need not be expensive.

Step 3: Get a proper website.

This is a big one, and possibly one of the most important things you can do. Everyone has a myspace site, but to set yourself out from the crowd, I’ve found a proper website with domain (eg: www.youonline.com) is the way to go.

Web hosting is extremely cheap nowadays, and web development software is free, so there’s no cost barriers to getting this done.Your website must display three things clearly.

1) Your music. Try to have a track start playing when the site is opened.

2) Your photos.

3) Contact information. This is make or break. Make it clear and obvious.

So why the website? Why not stick to myspace? Well, I’ve found that A&R people usually have a million things going on at once. Their offices look like a war zone for the most part. They won’t be searching the web for sites - instead, they may have received a tip-off or recommendation about you.

Your website will be looked at in passing, so you don’t want to cloud the A&R persons attention with a glaring, comment ridden myspace page. Secondly, everyone has a myspace page. My brothers cat has a myspace page..

So set yourself apart from all the other players.But keep the myspace page as well. It’s good for everyone to see you have thousands of friends and fans too..

Step 4: Play out.

Now you’ve got your package together, start playing to audiences. Anywhere you think industry types may be. And it’s not just A&R people you’re after. Promoters, managers…all these people may see you perform. If you’re good, word will get passed around quickly enough, and opportunities will present themselves. Which leads me onto..

Step 5: Attract the attention of a music attorney.

Want to know who are the most under-rated, yet important people in the music industry? The music attorney. These people know everyone…A&R execs, managers, the works. If you manage to meet one (and it’s easier than you think..) doors will open for you, especially if the attorney becomes involved with you on a professional level.

Step 6: Go to industry days and events.

Here’s a story. Whilst I was promoting an artist, there was a music event on in town: A gathering of music equipment manufacturers, open to the general public. In the small print of the flyer, a “demo session” was advertised as part of the music event, giving folks the opportunity to take their demo CD’s along for the critique of music professionals.

So I went to the demo session, armed with a CD thinking they’d be a huge demand for this, and that there was only a small chance my CD would get listened to. I was wrong. There were about 6 people there, including me. So whilst downstairs, in the main hall, thousands of up-and-coming artists were playing with the new toys from instrument companies, I was upstairs with the attention of attorneys, managers and A&R men, all to myself. Can you believe this? It’s true.

The moral of this point? Keep your eyes and ears open for every chance you get.

Conclusion.

Hopefully, this has given you some ideas on how to get the attention of A&R folks. So what happened when the A&R guy from Sony came to my house? Well, he wasn’t impressed when he found out my artist didn’t write her own material..but that’s a tale for another day!



Self-promotion for Recording Contracts

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009
Veronica Lane asked:


Recording Contracts

Is it truly harder to get a recording contract than ever before? Maybe it is because the music biz seems more about the business side rather than the music side these days. It is true that the music and the people making it is still how they make their money, but the approach is much different when it comes to giving out recording contracts .

Remember when record companies actually opened the unsolicited demo tapes that were sent to them and listened to them in hopes to find the next big thing. Now, it is too difficult to listen to every single one of them because everyone has the ability to have a demo tape made. Music contracts seem scarce. Now, it seems too difficult or to risky to accept demos from just anyone.

Don’t worry there is still a chance for you or your band to be noticed and get heard. It just may not be done the old fashioned way. It is all about the self-promotion tactic. You have to market your band in such a way that A&R and record labels will be dying to offer recording contracts .

Self-promotion isn’t as easy as it sounds. This does require a lot of planning and organizing. One way to do this is make and sell your own CDs. If you can prove to a label that you can sell CDs on your own, then they will know a music business contract with you is not so risky.

You need to make sure your album is good quality and sell it as fast as you can. Also, take a mini tour. Network with places in your region or tri-state area so you can book gigs and be seen! Build a resume with tons of recommendations from club and bar owners. Start out at places 30 miles away then move to 100 miles then 200 and so on. Building a solid fan base is a sure fire way to get the attention of a major label and get offered recording contracts .

Keep in mind that before you make thousands of CDs, put a marketing plan in place. Make sure you have a clear cut and concise idea of just how you will sell all those bad boys.

It is all about planning and some killer self-promotions. You have to be seen, known and heard by and at as many place and by as many people as possible. The industry isn’t what it used to be. You have to work for the attention of a label and to be offered music contracts. But luckily, it isn’t impossible so get to planning!



Independent Labels of All Shapes and Sizes

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009
Ty Cohen asked:


While exploring how to start an Independent record label, you will find that they appear in all shapes and sizes. Depending on who you are and what your expectations may be, you can decide how large or small your label is. Deciding how to start and run an independent label is totally up to you and that is the beautiful thing about owning your own label.

The larger, well-funded Indie labels are prearranged by departments similar to the major labels. Obviously, the more money a label has to work with, the more people they can hire to handle the various responsibilities of a label. Sometimes, independent labels have become so large that major labels buy them out, if the owner is willing to sell and take over. This may be the ideal situation for some and for others, perhaps not. It all depends on your personal goals for your record label and your artists.

Smaller, more compact Indie labels coordinate the work of promoting, selling and publicizing their releases by every one pitching in on every job that needs to be accomplished. You will find while discovering how to start a record label, that your smaller labels have the tremendous task of doing the A&R, communicating with radio stations about airtime, negotiating with distributors, soliciting music retailers, and arranging all publicity. This is in addition to dealing directly with their artists and helping them book shows and schedule tours.

Honestly, aside from control over everything, perhaps the greatest thing starting your own label is freedom of choice. Some independent labels make some of the best albums because of their ability to choose who, what, where, when and how. There are no corporate gurus trying to bend and twist the artist into someone that they are not. They are free to play, record and perform according to who they are. So while trying to figure out how to start an independent label, keep all these things in mind.

Running a record label doesn’t have to be an overly expensive and time-consuming job. But it will take hard work and determination in addition to some great talent. The more research and preparation a new label performs before hopping on board, the greater their chances are of succeeding. It is a competitive business but with the right attitude and the right talent you just might get your piece of the billion dollar pie.



Budgeting Your Independent Label

Friday, June 12th, 2009
Ty Cohen asked:


When calculating how to start a record label, you will need a budget. A simple way to break things down is by using categories, Income and Expense. Keep it simple because I am going to gather that most of us aren’t accountants. Remember though, these are only your expected costs and profits. There will always be unexpected costs that are beyond our control so set aside some funds for these.

Sources of Income

1. Record Sales are number one on this list. This is you selling your actual records.

2. Digital sales & ringtones may be the wave of the future when it comes to profits. Although these profits can be small, there are at least there to be counted.

3. Broadcast Income which is income from having your recordings played on the radio, T.V. or played in public places.

4. Licensing which may come from other companies in the form of a royalty or fee.

5. Secondary Licensing which may come from having your music licensed by advertisements, video games, films etc…

6. Merchandise, Touring, Fan club, Website, Branding, and Sponsorship.

7. International broadcast and licensing income from international air play is another source of income that may be generated.

Then you will have your expenses when figuring out how to start and run an independent record label. Although you may not have some of these expenses in the beginning or in the present, there is a possibility for them in the future so plan accordingly.

Expenses

1. Your staples such as rent, utilities, business rates, telephone, computers, insurance, office equipment and supplies.

2. Staffing which you may choose to avoid in the beginning when budgets are tight.

3. Taxes

4. Publishing

5. Recording, mixing and mastering recordings

6. Producers Fees

7. Artists advances and expenses

8. Travel

9. Manufacturing costs

10. Artwork and Design for covers or other promotional items.

11.Videos

12. Radio and TV promotion

13. Press (PR)

14. Advertising and Direct Marketing promotion of your product

15. Distribution Fees and Sales Costs

No need to worry because it seems that the expenses outweigh the income. When deciding on how to start a record label and while planning your budget keep in mind that all these expenses don’t come at once. Keeping fixed costs, such as rent and utilities, as low as possible will help your label deal with successful and less successful times. Also, remember that costs are often payable well in advance of the related income It may seem like a balancing act but it really is all just a matter of planning how to start and run an independent record label in the end.



Who Can Start an Independent Label?

Monday, June 8th, 2009
Ty Cohen asked:


Are you a struggling artist who just wants their music to be heard or are you someone who is frustrated with the major labels and everything that comes along with them? It doesn’t matter who you are or what you have accomplished, anyone who has the desire can learn how to start an independent label. Over the next few minutes, we are going to explore why starting an Indie label is such a great idea.

Let’s say you are that struggling artist who can’t seem to catch a break. You want your music recorded and released to the public but can’t seem to get signed. Well, now-a-days, this isn’t a problem. Even if you thought you didn’t know how to start a record label before, you are about to learn just how easy it is.

Get in the studio, record your album and start selling. Is it really that easy? Well, yes and no. Yes, that is what you do and once you have accomplished the first step then you are well on your way.

Some people say they want to know how to start and run an independent label but they are worried because they aren’t artists themselves. That is absolutely ok. Maybe you are just a fan or just a lover of music, not a performer. This may be a plus for you. Although not always true but sometimes the creative artsy types have a harder time running the business side of a label. Maybe you should team up and have the best of worlds, a lover of and a performer of music.

Independent labels offer freedom for artists and owners. They also are known to have a bigger return on investment because there are less people to split profits with. You will retain complete creative control and all the rights to your music. If you have been searching for how to start an independent label, then look no further. The future is in the palm of your hands. It is relatively inexpensive in the beginning and when profits are generated then you will expand.

The time is now because the music market is expanding and the door is wide open for independent labels. It is better than ever so you need to act. Find a mentor that can help you learn how to start a record label if you need to. But you need to get in while the getting is good.



New Rap/Hip hop Record Label

Monday, June 8th, 2009
Wes asked:


Yesterday the newest Rap/Hip hop Label named as M’Town G’s was created in Winston-Salem, NC. The CEO is Wes “Hardhead” Miller and the associate CEO is Christian “o skool” Key. In a couple of weeks they are going to start a search for the best rappers from the Winston-Salem area and then head to the Charlotte area and proceed south until they reach Miami. 

To Visit the main Website go to http://mtowngs.weebly.com/ or go to there myspace if you are interested in there services at http://www.myspace.com/m39towng39s. They are trying to find the next Tupac or Biggie so don’t be suprised if they don’t accept you. They are very young label so give them some time.

They Head recruiter Ishaun Fair will be looking for the new rap talent across the country but Wes Miller and Christian Key will assist him. They rap group rivals are the Group called Goon Squad located outside of the Lexington, NC Area. 

They are looking for the greatest rappers because that is about the only way you can get to the top of the Record labels business. If you are interested in joining the group M’Town G’s go to Makavelindis@hotmail.com and that is the CEO’s e-mail.

If you go to the web site make sure that you go to the life as a g section on the 2nd page which talks more about what they are trying to find and the big problem they are trying to solve. They are trying to make history with finding a great rapper.

 

 

 

 



Recording Contracts and Your Rights

Monday, June 1st, 2009
Ty Cohen asked:


Your rights when it relates to recording contracts and the ones you are giving up are important to understand for any newly signed artist. This will be identified as your “Grant of Rights” clause in your new music contract. Please make sure you have a solid understanding of this and all it entails.

A Grant of Rights clause documents the rights that you permit the record company to have control of once you sign the music business contract. The first thing this clause will define is that the company will have sole control over any masters or copyrights from anything you record during the term of the contract.

The second point that is discussed is that the company has the exclusive right to distribute or reproduce any recording throughout the country or even internationally.

The third point will be that the label is the absolute owner of any record, album or work that you have created during the contract. Meaning, it belongs to them, not you. It is something to think about.

You may also have to agree that you will be exclusively retained by the recording company and will not work for or record with any other label or with any other individual during the life of your music contract.

Lastly, you may have to grant the company the right to use and publish your name, likeness and any biographical material for promotions or other activities. This is pretty standard in every music business contract.

Honestly, as you can see, you will have a lot to think about when in comes to signing music contracts with major labels. Although it may have been a lifelong dream of yours, it might end up seeming as if you sold your life away. But keep in mind that this is going to be the case with any music business contract with any label. You have a lot to think about and discuss.

The Grant of Rights clause is the clincher for some people to refuse but honestly, if a recording contract is what you want then you are going to have to agree to their terms. Your only other options are to start your own record label or join an independent label who has less restrictive requirements. But if signing with a major label is a dream come true for you then go for it, just educate yourself on what you are getting into.